Insights from Nebo

Scroll Down
June 7, 2013

National Donut Day Throwdown

Everyone who knows Nebo knows we take our donuts seriously.

So, for National Donut Day, we filled the office with dozens of treats from the best spot in Atlanta - Sublime Doughnuts (not that we needed a holiday as an excuse). But that was only the beginning of the celebration here at Nebo.

After the grazers of the office got their fill, two of our bravest and most confident eaters stepped up to the plate for a gut-busting, winner-take-all donut eating contest.

June 6, 2013

A Second Look at Google+

Since Google+ launched to huge demand in the summer of 2011, it has been ridiculed as a “ghost town” - as Google’s sad wannabe social network. It’s that social site that you accidentally check once a month - only to confirm that, yes, there’s nothing still going on.

But in January, eMarketer confirmed that Google+ has surpassed Twitter to become the 2nd largest social network worldwide, behind Facebook, serving 26% of internet users - with 343 million active users according to GlobalWebIndex.

Even so, Google is smart enough to know that this race will be a marathon and not a sprint. After taking a second look at Google+, we think it’s poised to become not necessarily the largest, but the most successful social network in the long run.

June 3, 2013

Can the Windows Phone Make Microsoft Relevant Again?

There comes a time in every brand’s life when it must either adapt to new challenges in the marketplace, or risk fading away altogether. In the digital age, that leaves many brands scrambling to amplify their mobile presence in a last ditch effort to stay relevant. And why wouldn’t they? Apple’s iPhone and Google’s Android OS launched both tech giants, respectively, into new stratospheres upon their release, and now Microsoft is hoping to achieve the same success with its up-start Windows phone.

May 30, 2013

Corporate Catfishing: How Brands Exaggerate, Bend the Truth & Flat Out Lie to Consumers

People have been lying to each other for thousands and thousands of years—before we could speak words to each other, even.

But, “A-ooga, a-ooga!” you say.

You really expect me to believe that?

The problem is that lying for kids today is so damn easy, what with all the social media and whatnot. I remember when you used to have to actually look someone in the eyes when you lied to them (uphill both ways!). It used to take serious stones to purposefully deceive someone, especially someone you cared about.

Not anymore! Nowadays it takes a computer savvy fibber about 5 minutes to fabricate an entire online identity, through which they can spew falsehoods toward anyone who will hear them with very little risk of discovery or backlash. It’s become so easy, in fact, to ensnare people in romantic trysts with your online alter ego that it almost seems crazy NOT to.

It’s called Catfishing, and now it’s not just antisocial weirdos who are creating digital personas in an attempt to lure in people who would otherwise never associate with them. Brands and businesses are joining in on the fun.

How? Read on.

May 24, 2013

The Arrogance & Influence of Alexey Brodovitch

Photographer Irving Penn had heard that his friend, mentor and father figure, Alexey Brodovitch, was on his deathbed. Years of drinking and chain smoking had caught up with the Russian aristocrat, and everyone believed he was down to his last days. However, when Penn arrived at the hospital for one last visit, he was met with another surprise.

“Thanks for sending me a copy of your book, but, frankly, I must tell you its terrible,” said Brodovitch from his hospital bed. Penn was startled. Would these really be the last words he would ever hear from Brodovitch? Would this be how he would remember the man who influenced and transformed his work, who made him the photographer he is today? Then it hit him. If the man was still filled with this much acid, he was surely going to be ok.

You see, Alexey Brodovitch, one of the greatest and most influential art directors of the 20th century, wasn’t known for his tenderness. He wasn’t known for being supportive. He wasn’t known for being a happy man.

Brodovitch was known for introducing America to European modernism and revolutionizing magazine design. He was known for exposing us to new talents such as Salvadore Dali and Herbert Bayer, and teaching great photographers such as Frank Roberts and Richard Avedon. He was known as the father of modern art direction, using unconventional and experimental designs that are common practice today. He was known for a lack of sympathy, decisive action, chain-smoking, and for being a drunk and a bit of a hard ass.

And the worlds of design, illustration, photography and art direction are better for it.