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What's On Your Personal Mood Board?

Inspiration, as the cliché says, can spring from anywhere. However, how often do we vacate our usual books, blogs, and bits of pop culture to discover what inspirations lie beyond our sphere of influence?

As creatives, it is important that we act as sponges of the world, soaking up knowledge so that we may better reflect and interpret it. With that said, we should be a little adventurous in finding inspiration in order to refresh our thinking. Not only does researching and participating in something new provide sources of inspiration, but it improves our cognitive thinking by causing us to break our usual patterns.

Finding a new source of inspiration doesn’t have to be a chore, either. Just take little things in your life and use your imagination to come up with ways to skew the experience. Try reading a book from the children’s section of a book store while actually sitting in a chair in the children’s section. Be a fly on the wall at an elderly singles function. Maybe take a class in medieval cuisine or advance geo physics. Or, just take the time to do something you haven’t found the time to actually do. Whatever the case, opening yourself to new habits and experiences can only lead you to greater inspirations.

Written by Ken Hammond on October 8, 2010

Comments

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Ken says:

Thanks for the comment.

You're right about trying new things. By opening yourself up, you gain valuable insight that can lead to inspiration, either giving you a unique idea, or making you better able to relate to your audience.

Riaz Sidi says:

Stepping outside of the box can be a challenge for many.

I agree, we should come out of our shell and not be afraid to try new things.

Many are afraid they will be perceived as a failure once they try a new task and don't instantly see success.

But I say not to let others influence your decision to not try at all - the biggest failure there can be.

Written by
Ken Hammond